As the Rugby World Cup reaches its knockout stages, much media attention is being given to players suffering head injuries. In separate games against Australia and Fiji, the Welsh fly-half Dan Biggar was forced to leave the field of play early, bringing into question his ongoing participation

This comes at the same time as the sporting world learned of the very sad death of American boxer Patrick Day at the age of 27 following a brain injury that was sustained during a super welterweight bout in Chicago. Whilst high profile sporting incidents like these are relatively rare, as occupational and accidental injuries, they are unfortunately very common in the wider world. As a personal injury Solicitor, I have been instructed many times by victims of head injuries that have been acquired as a result of a serious road traffic accident, assault or an accident whilst at work.

The consequences for the accident victim and their family can be far-reaching and not immediately apparent especially in the case of subtle head injuries where from a distance, no apparent injury is visible. In cases such as this, we rely heavily on the witness evidence of friends and family who can comment on personality changes which may manifest themselves following an accident.

All head injuries are high profile for the victim, however, sustained. Our experienced team at Stone Rowe Brewer Personal Injury can provide advice based on experience for all those involved.